Drive On: New Lakeshore Road Bridge opens ahead of schedule

Mayor officially re-opens the Lakeshore Road Bridge over Sixteen Mile Creek paving way for a revitalized downtown

The transformation of Lakeshore Road Bridge was marked today with an official opening where Mayor Rob Burton was joined by Ward 2 Councillors Cathy Duddeck and Ray Chisholm and Ward 3 Councillors Dave Gittings and Nick Hutchins to unveil a commemorative plaque that will be installed on the bridge and cut a ceremonial ribbon.  He then climbed aboard the town’s vintage fire truck and was the first person over the newly reconstructed bridge.

“I am extremely pleased that the bridge has been able to be opened ahead of schedule —just in time for our Santa Claus Parade.  On behalf of Council, I would also like to thank everyone for their patience throughout the construction,” said Mayor Rob Burton.  “With the completion of the bridge, the rejuvenation of Downtown Oakville is underway. Changing the streetscape in downtown Oakville will help pave the way for a revitalized downtown. This investment demonstrates a major commitment to our downtown, which is essential to the cultural and economic well-being of our community.”

With Lakeshore Road East (Navy Street to Allan Street) coming to the end of its lifespan and needing a major reconstruction, the town undertook extensive research and public consultation to identify broader opportunities to improve traffic, beautify streets and improve pedestrian/cycle ways in the downtown. In October 2015, Council approved the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project as part of the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS) study. The Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project  will begin in 2019 and be completed over a two year period.

The Lakeshore Road Bridge at Sixteen Mile Creek reconstruction took place in advance of the road project as inspections of the bridge revealed its condition warranted immediate attention.

The new bridge replaces a 50-year-old bridge that carried about 15,000 vehicles across every day before it was torn down. The first bridge was built in 1832, followed by replacement bridges in 1850, 1878, 1895, 1924, 1967 and 2017.

The new structure includes two travel lanes and bikes lanes. There is also a wider pedestrian sidewalk with a barrier wall to separate the sidewalk and vehicular traffic. New pedestrian railings and lookouts are included as well as LED lighting. The Lakeshore Road approaches to the bridge between Navy Street and Forsythe Street were also reconstructed and streetscaped with similar materials planned for the eventual reconstruction of Lakeshore Road in 2019/2020.

Visit oakville.ca to watch videos and check out photos of the bridge coming down and being rebuilt. Witness months of construction in just minutes with a time-lapse video; get a closer look at the old steel girders being removed and check out photos of the concrete pour on the bridge deck.

“The bridge was originally scheduled to be completed by mid-December so we are very pleased to be able to open it for businesses, residents and visitors a month ahead of schedule,” said Dan Cozzi, Director, Engineering and Construction. “This has been a very significant and important project for us and we are very happy with the overall result.”

The overall project budget for the new structure, including engineering design, contracted construction and project management costs was just over $10 million. While final invoices have not been processed, the overall cost is expected to come in below the budget amount.

Some additional minor works will be completed over the next three to four weeks but this work will not impact traffic or pedestrian access.

In preparation for the bridge closure, Navy Street was permanently converted to two-way traffic between Lakeshore and Rebecca/Randall streets in January 2017. As part of the Council approved Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS), Navy Street is one of several streets in downtown Oakville scheduled to be converted to two-way operation.  The other streets are scheduled to be converted in 2018.

The Downtown Plan, launched in December 2013, is comprised of the Downtown Cultural Hub Study (DCH), and the Downtown Transportation and Streetscape Study (DTS).

For details, please visit oakville.ca

 

Fact Sheet
Lakeshore Road Bridge over Sixteen Mile Creek
Re-Opening – Friday, November 17, 2017

  • Opened on November 17, 2017, approximately one month ahead of schedule. The bridge was originally scheduled to be completed by December 15, 2017.

  • The bridge is a three-span concrete deck slab on steel I-beams supported by two piers and abutments on each side of the valley slope.
  • The bridge features two travel lanes and bikes lanes; a wider pedestrian sidewalk with a barrier wall to separate the sidewalk and vehicular traffic; new pedestrian railings and lookouts as well as LED lighting.

  • The approximate life span of the new bridge is 75 years.

  • Approximately 125 people have worked on the bridge at one time or another over the last 8 months.

  • The new bridge replaces a 50-year-old bridge that carried approximately 15,000 vehicles across every day before it was torn down.

  • The new bridge is the seventh bridge to span this section of Sixteen Mile Creek.  The first bridge was built in 1832, followed by replacement bridges in 1850, 1878, 1895, 1924, 1967 and 2017.

  • The bridge constructed in 1895 which was known as the “Aberdeen Swing Bridge” was constructed at a cost of $11,000.

·         The overall project budget for the new structure, including engineering design, contracted construction and project management costs was just over $10 million. While final invoices have not been processed, the overall cost is expected to come in below the budget amount.

Lakeshore Road Reconstruction Project — Navy to Allan Street

  • With Lakeshore Road East (Navy Street to Allan Street) coming to the end of its lifespan and needing a major reconstruction, the town undertook extensive research and public consultation to identify broader opportunities to improve traffic, beautify streets and improve pedestrian/cycle ways in the downtown.

  • The town is now moving forward with the Lakeshore Road Reconstruction and Streetscape Project to revitalize Downtown Oakville.

  • On February 13, 2017, Council approved the bridge railing, the lighting and the furniture selections (streetlight poles, benches, bollards, bike rings) for downtown Oakville. The new curbs and pavers are included in the new Lakeshore Road Bridge over Sixteen Mile Creek.

  • Construction is scheduled to start in spring 2019 and be delivered in two phases:
    • Phase 1 in 2019 (spring to fall) —between Navy and Dunn streets
    • Phase 2 in 2020 (spring to fall) — between Dunn and Allan streets.

Southeast Oakville – Recent Break and Enters Update

Since September 1st there have been a series of break and enters in Southeast Oakville. The Halton Police have prepared a status update below to provide residents information about these crimes, what the police are doing and how you can help and protect your home. Please take the time to read the status update.

 

 Status Update

Just click on the image above to open the full .pdf file in a new tab.

 

Anyone with information regarding these crimes is asked to contact investigators in the Oakville Residential Break and Enter Unit at 905-825-4747 ext 2216.

Tips can be forwarded to  Crime Stoppers; “See Something, Hear Something, Say Something” at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), through the web at www.crimestoppers.ca or by texting “Tip201” with your message to 274637 (crimes).

 

More information is available through the links below:

https://www.haltonpolice.ca/about/media/view_release.php?releaseID=1220

https://www.haltonpolice.ca/mobile_app/index.php

https://www.haltonpolice.ca/services/publications/businessplan.php

 

Upcoming Meeting on Situation With Glen Abbey Golf Course

Enclosed please find the Notice of Statutory Public Meeting with respect to the Town Initiated Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment regarding the property municipally known as

1333 Dorval Drive (Glen Abbey Golf Course).

 

Statutory Public Meeting: Tuesday, December 5, 2017
Time:   7:00 pm
Location:  Council Chamber, Town Hall

 

This notice was sent out by mail, email and published in the Oakville Beaver on November 9, 2017.

All queries or comments on this application should be directed to Lesley Gill-Woods at extension 3261 or by email at lesley.gill-woods@oakville.ca

To Support the Town’s Position on Glen Abbey

For residents who want to do more to support the town’s position on Glen Abbey. At this point in time, you may suggest to residents that they contact their provincial government representatives such as Premier Wynne, Minister of Municipal Affairs Bill Mauro at minister.mma@ontario.ca, and local MPP Kevin Flynn at kflynn.mpp.co@liberal.ola.org to request their support for Glen Abbey. As the provincial election approaches, residents may also want to raise this issue at all-candidate meetings to ask candidates to state their position on Glen Abbey.

In addition, Ontario Municipal Board hearings are open to the public. Once a hearing date is set, we will be communicating with the public on the official process to register as participants at the hearing. Individuals who spoke at the public meeting, or wrote to the town to express their views on the applications, may ask for party status at the hearing. Similarly, the Conservation Review Board hearing on the objection to the Notice of Intention to Designate Glen Abbey as a Cultural Heritage Landscape is also a public hearing and we will share more information once a hearing date is established. Up to date information will be posted on the town’s Glen Abbey information webpage.

Oakville goes to court to protect Glen Abbey cultural heritage site

The town has initiated a court application to determine its rights and jurisdiction under the Ontario Heritage Act in connection with the Glen Abbey Golf Course. This action was taken in response to the announcement by ClubLink, the owners of the golf course, that it would be seeking to make an application to demolish all buildings (other than the Raydor Estate and the Stables) on the site and remove the Glen Abbey Golf Course in its entirety.

“Oakville has a longstanding commitment to protecting heritage resources across the town, and numerous heritage experts have advised us that Glen Abbey merits protection,” Mayor Burton said. “ClubLink has ignored the process outlined in the Ontario Heritage Act to object to heritage designations. We do not see how demolishing the buildings and removing the golf course would meet provincial requirements that heritage landscapes be conserved.”

The court application seeks direction regarding what the Ontario Heritage Act permits, and what obligations and duties rest with the town in processing a demolition application that it considers to be not authorized by the legislation.

In May 2017, a detailed heritage evaluation prepared by a team of experts concluded that the Glen Abbey property met all nine provincial criteria for municipal heritage protection. Meeting one criterion alone is considered sufficient to designate.

The town then retained European golf course and heritage expert, Ken Moodie, to prepare a detailed review of the golf course heritage attributes, and Julian Smith, an internationally renowned expert on heritage landscapes, to provide his opinion on the course and the merits of designation.

On the basis of the expert opinions provided to the town, town staff recommended heritage designation, and Council approved this recommendation on August 21, 2017.

Public notice of the town’s intention to designate the Glen Abbey Golf Course under the Ontario Heritage Act as a cultural heritage landscape was issued on August 24, 2017.

Under the Ontario Heritage Act, individuals had 30 days to object to this Notice of Intention to Designate and seek a hearing before the Conservation Review Board on the heritage merits of the proposed designation. ClubLink filed no objection. Instead, ClubLink wrote to the town to state its intention to submit an application to demolish all buildings (other than the Raydor Estate and the Stables) and remove the golf course in its entirety. Pacific Life, the mortgagee of the property, did issue an objection, and a Conservation Review Board hearing is expected to be held later this year.

On September 27, 2017, Council voted unanimously to refuse ClubLink’s application to redevelop the Glen Abbey Golf Course lands to permit 141 detached dwellings, 299 townhouse dwellings, 2782 apartment dwellings with retail and office commercial uses, parks and open space, and natural heritage uses. The staff materials before Council recommending that Council refuse the applications for zoning and official plan amendments noted that the applications did not represent good planning and were not consistent or in conformity with applicable provincial, regional and town policy. Last night, Planning and Development Council also refused ClubLink’s application for its Plan of Subdivision.

ClubLink has already appealed the refusal of their development application to the Ontario Municipal Board. No hearing dates have yet been set.

Visit oakville.ca for details.

ClubLink appeals Glen Abbey applications to the Ontario Municipal Board

ClubLink Corporation has appealed Town Council’s decision of September 27, 2017 to refuse their application to redevelop Glen Abbey Golf Course to the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB). ClubLink had applied to the town for an official plan amendment, a zoning by-law amendment and approval of a plan of subdivision to permit 141 detached dwellings, 299 townhouse dwellings, 2782 apartment dwellings with retail and office commercial uses, parks and open space and natural heritage uses.

“The town is not surprised that ClubLink has appealed Council’s decision to the Ontario Municipal Board,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “The town is prepared to vigorously defend Council’s decision that ClubLink’s applications do not represent good planning for this site and are not consistent or in conformity with applicable provincial, regional and town policy.”

Town Planning staff had recommended refusal of the application to Council. According to Mark Simeoni, the town’s director of Planning, “The town’s cultural heritage landscape study identified the Glen Abbey property as a significant cultural heritage landscape that should be conserved. The town-wide urban structure review identified where and how the town should grow, and Glen Abbey was not identified as a potential site for future growth. These conclusions are so significant that staff must recommend that the applications not proceed.”

Two days of public meetings were held on September 26 and 27, 2017 to consider Clublink’s applications for an official plan amendment, a zoning by-law amendment and approval of its draft plan of subdivision. While Council refused the official plan and zoning amendments on September 27, 2017, under the Planning Act, decisions on applications for approval of a draft plan of subdivision can be made no sooner than 14 days after the public meeting is held. The application for the approval of ClubLink’s draft plan of subdivision is scheduled to come back to Planning and Development Council on November 6, 2017.

For more information on Glen Abbey, visit oakville.ca.

How to protect yourself from phone scams

The following is advice from the Halton Regional Police Service:

  • Identify the individual. Ask for photo identification. Get their name, name of the company or charity they represent.
  • All utility companies will send correspondence or book an appointment prior to accessing your home to do work.
  • Do not let them into your home unless you are sure they represent a reputable utility company.  If you are unsure, contact the company prior to permitting them into your home.  Have the individual wait outside while you contact the company.
  • When calling the company, look up to company’s contact information in the phone book or online.  Do not use contact information provided by the individual as it may be fake.
  • Never share personal information such as date of birth, banking information, credit card information, or Social Insurance Number.
  • Do not show them copies of bills or financial statements.
  • Never respond to unsolicited offers of service.
  • Research the company they represent.
  • Ask the person to leave their information and return next week. This will give you plenty of time to verify their credentials and the validity of the visit.
  • Never give cash to door-to-door people who are offering a service or demanding payment.
  • Be cautious of people that demand immediate and up-front payment.
  • Do not sign any contract unless you read the fine print.
  • If a contract is signed within the home, you have a cooling off period. For example, in Ontario consumers have the right to cancel a contract for any reason within a 10-day cooling off period. For water heater contracts, there is a 20-day cooling off period.

Notice to Designate Glen Abbey as a Cultural Heritage Landscape Approved

Council Chambers of Oakville filled up with residents and quickly overflowed into the atrium to hear if the decision by Councillors would be to issue a notice to designate the Glen Abbey Property as a cultural heritage landscape, which was recommended in a staff report of August 10, 2017.

Speaker upon speaker urged councillors to accept the staff report to designate the Glen Abbey as a cultural heritage landscape as outlined under Section 29, Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act.

Ontario Cultural Heritage Landscape Designation

Under the Ontario Heritage Act, Oakville can pass bylaws to formally designate properties of cultural heritage value or interest. Formal designation of heritage properties is one way of publicly acknowledging a property’s heritage value to a community. At the same time, designation helps to ensure the conservation of these important places for the benefit and enjoyment of present and future generations.

There are six key steps to designating the Glen Abbey property under section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act. These include:

  • Identifying the property as a candidate for designation;
  • Researching and evaluating the property;
  • Serving Notice of Intention to Designate, with an opportunity for objection;
  • Passing and registering the designation bylaw;
  • Listing the property on the municipal register; and
  • Listing on the provincial register.

The next step in issuing a notice to designate Glen Abbey as a Cultural Heritage Landscape the following has to happen:

  • Oakville must notify the owner as well as the Ontario Heritage Trust, and
  • Publish a Notice of Intention to Designate in the Oakville Beaver, and hopefully in OakvilleNews.Org.

Under section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, the notice to ClubLink and the Ontario Heritage Trust must include the following:

  • The Description of the Glen Abbey Property so that it can be readily ascertained;
  • The Statement of Cultural Heritage Value or Interest, which identifies the Glen Abbey property’s heritage significance;
  • The Description of Heritage Attributes outlining the particular features that should be protected for the future; and
  • A statement that notice of objection to the designation must by filed with the municipality within 30 days after the date of publication of the newspaper notice.

ClubLink will likely file an objection to the notice of designation with Oakville within the 30-day requirement. Oakville council must refer ClubLink’s objection to the Conservation Review Board (CRB) for a hearing. After the hearing, the CRB will provide a recommendation to either the Oakville council or the Honourable Eleanor McMahon the Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport, who have the final decision.

Town Councillors have started the process to designate the Glen Abbey Property as a cultural heritage landscape. However, ClubLink will go to extreme lengths in order to rezone the property as a subdivision. Their application was forced to a stay of one year, and then to a second year as the town prepared studies needed to make a decision. They appealed the first stay, and went to the OMB to appeal the second stay, which ClubLink lost. Then, they went to the OMB in order to force the town to make a decision regarding ClubLinks Application for Development. The OMB agreed that the application was complete. This has forced the town to consider the application on September 26, 2017, with out fully completed studies.

On August 21, 2017, the Town of Oakville Council unanimously decided to issue a notice to designate the Glen Abbey property as a cultural heritage landscape. After the decision was made Council Chambers filled with applause. However, this is not over yet.

– Nolan A Machan, Oakville News

Annual report highlights Oakville council achievements for 2016

The Town of Oakville is inviting residents to check out its latest report card.

Oakville’s 2016 Annual Report is now available for viewing on the town’s website.

Town staff said the report highlights key achievements the town has made in delivering on goals outlined in the 2015-18 Strategic Plan.

“Providing the public with a ‘report card’ on the projects and issues affecting their community is one critical way council and staff work to engage with residents,” said Oakville Mayor Rob Burton.

“Council is proud to share some of the key accomplishments of 2016 in this year’s annual report.”

The report noted that an audit performed by the external auditors KPMG found the financial statements prepared by the town to be a fair presentation of the financial position and financial results for the past year.

Town listed as its key successes in 2016, including:

  • Efforts to move forward in revitalizing the historic downtown through the Lakeshore Road East Reconstruction and Streetscape Project. In consultation with the community, a traditional streetscape furniture theme will be incorporated once the project begins in 2019.
  • Public input helping to shape the future use of the former hospital site lands, with demolition set to begin this fall and a new community centre scheduled to open in 2020.
  • The introduction of the Public Engagement Hub, Livable Oakville Performance Dashboard, launch of Oakville Transit’s real-time bus tracking app, and additions to open data sets all helped to advance the town’s web and digital strategies.
  • Continued partnership with Oakville’s three Business Improvement Areas helping these business districts move forward on their retail action plans with the implementation of the patio and parking strategy.
  • Several reviews of the town’s Livable Oakville Plan, which took place in 2016 to explore how the town will accommodate growth and development in the years ahead.

To read Oakville’s 2016 Annual Report visit www.oakville.ca.

– Oakville Beaver, July 28 

Oakville’s 2016 Annual Report now available Report highlights the Town of Oakville’s accomplishments and commitment to fiscal stability

The Town of Oakville is pleased to release the 2016 Annual Report, highlighting key achievements in delivering on the goals outlined in the 2015-2018 Strategic Plan and continued success in maintaining Oakville’s fiscal health.

“Providing the public with a report card’ on the projects and issues affecting their community is one critical way Council and staff work to engage with residents,” Mayor Rob Burton said. “Council is proud to share some of the key accomplishments of 2016 in this year’s Annual Report.”

The town’s external auditors, KPMG, have again provided an unqualified audit opinion on the Consolidated Financial Statements. An unqualified, or “clean” audit opinion indicates that the financial statements prepared by the town are a fair presentation of the town’s financial position and financial results for the past year.

The report also outlines some of the town’s key successes achieved in 2016, including:

  • Efforts to move forward in revitalizing our historic downtown took shape with progress on the Lakeshore Road East Reconstruction and Streetscape Project. In consultation with the community, a traditional streetscape furniture theme will be incorporated once the project begins in 2019.
  • Public input also helped to shape the future use of the former hospital site lands, with demolition set to begin this fall and new community centre scheduled to open in 2020.
  • The introduction of the Public Engagement Hub, Livable Oakville Performance Dashboard, launch of Oakville Transit’s Real-Time Bus Tracking app, and additions to open data sets all helped to advance the town’s web and digital strategies.
  • Continued partnership with Oakville’s three Business Improvement Areas helped these important business districts move forward on their retail action plans with the implementation of the patio and parking strategy.
  • Several reviews of the town’s Livable Oakville Plan took place in 2016 to explore how the town will accommodate growth and development in the years ahead, ensuring that Oakville continues to thrive as premier community to live, work and play.

To read about these and other accomplishments visit oakville.ca to view the 2016 Annual Report.

Municipal Info Network, August 8